JWQ Showcase 2017

Friday, April 28, 2017

JazzWorldQuest Update: Jazz Knowledge



 JazzWorldQuest Update: Jazz Knowledge

The End of Art and Jazz (from Philosophyofjazz.net)
Paulina Tendera

Jagiellonian University, Philosophy, Adjunct
Abstract:In the second half of the twentieth century, there was a great deal of talk about a phenomenon known in the art world as “the end of art.” This concept referred to significant, sometimes revolutionary changes in the perception of the work of art and changes in its manner of existence (its ontology). The very notion of the “end of art” was justified and inspired (though not entirely validly) by the philosophy of Georg Hegel. Art critics, wishing to exploit this idea, explained the incompatibility of their own comments with the original thought of Hegel in historical terms: Hegel had written…

CONTINENTAL DRIFT: 50 years of jazz from Europe – Conference Proceedings
Haftor Medboe
Edinburgh Napier University, Music, Faculty Member
Abstract: Following popular exposure in France to the proto-jazz of James Reese Europe and his 369th “Harlem Hellfighters” Infantry Regiment during the latter years of WW1, the jazz bug took hold and, in the period that followed, spread throughout Europe. This new mu- sic from the USA, drawing on the ethno-cultural melting pot of New Orleans, provided a soundtrack to the new order that was forged following the two world wars. Its spread marked the beginning of Europe’s complex relationship to jazz, a music associated vari- ously with exoticism, vice, youth, cultural decay, liberation, US imperialism,…

Schopenhauer’s Metaphysics of Music Illumines A Love Supreme
Jon Avery
Bluegrass Community and Technical College, Philosophy and Religious Studies, Emeritus
This is the lecture portion of a multi-media presentation on the use of Schopenhauer’s philosophy of music to understand A Love Supreme.

USA: 1 of 148 Trumpeter/Vocalist Bob Merrill's "Tell Me Your Troubles: Songs by Joe Bushkin, Vol. 1" Set for May 19 Release by Accurate Records


Trumpeter/Vocalist Bob Merrill
Celebrates the Musical Legacy of
Pianist/Songwriter Joe Bushkin with
"Tell Me Your Troubles:
Songs by Joe Bushkin, Vol. 1,"
Set for May 19 Release by Accurate Records
  

First Volume of Two-Album Tribute Project
Features Rhythm Section of
Howard Alden, Nicki Parrott, & Steve Johns
Plus Guest Appearances by Singer Eric Comstock,
Bucky Pizzarelli, Harry Allen, Wycliffe Gordon,
& Virtuoso Vocal Accompanists
Laurence Hobgood & John Colianni at the Piano

Merrill to Serve as Musical Director
For Bushkin Centennial Concert
At BMCC Tribeca Performing Arts Center, NYC,
Thursday, May 4
    


April 24, 2017


Bob Merrill Tell Me Your Troubles Coinciding with the centennial of pianist/composer Joe Bushkin's birth, the release on May 19 by trumpeter and singer Bob Merrill of Tell Me Your Troubles: Songs by Joe Bushkin, Vol. 1 (Accurate Records) celebrates the musical legacy of a man who was revered by many of America's foremost entertainers for his wizardry at the keyboard and skills as a tunesmith. He also happened to be Merrill's father-in-law.

Bushkin penned songs with his longtime lyricist John DeVries or the great Johnny Burke in the repertoires of the likes of Sinatra (Joe's "Oh! Look at Me Now" was Frank's first hit), Bing Crosby, Nat "King" Cole, Benny Goodman, Louis Jordan, and countless others. This first volume of a planned two-album commemorative project pays reverential tribute to Bushkin's oeuvre and its special blend of mood and merriment on contemporary interpretations of 10 songs ranging from the popular to the obscure. The album opens and closes with archival spoken word salutes to Bushkin by Sinatra and comedian Red Buttons.
Cut from the same engaging entertainer's cloth as Bushkin -- not to mention trumpeter-singers like Louis Armstrong, Dizzy Gillespie, Louis Prima, and Chet Baker -- Merrill was already performing crowd-pleasers like "Oh! Look at Me Now" and "Boogie Woogie Blue Plate" (a 1947 hit for Louis Jordan and his Tympani Five) before he met his future wife Christina and bonded with her gregarious father. "These songs have such a timeless, universal appeal," says Merrill. "I really hope the album exposes them to a new generation. Maybe Harry Connick, Diana Krall, Michael Bublé, or even Lady Gaga will give them new life."
Tell Me Your Troubles is full of classic tunes and rediscoveries, charismatic vocals, swinging solos, and sparkling arrangements and presents Merrill at his elegant best, whether showcasing his brass palette of trumpet, cornet, and flugelhorn or his smooth Tormé-like vocals, easy articulation, and natural enthusiasm. In addition to the A-List rhythm section of guitarist Howard Alden, bassist Nicki Parrott, and drummer Steve Johns, the album features an illustrious list of guest artists including saxophonist Harry Allen, trombonist/singer Wycliffe Gordon, cabaret star Eric Comstock, guitarist Bucky Pizzarelli, and pianist Laurence Hobgood.







Joe Bushkin and Bob Merrill A previously unreleased performance of "Oh! Look at Me Now!," from Bushkin's final recording session in 2003 with Merrill, Howard Alden, and drummer Duffy Jackson, is one of the album's standouts. "Joe's tempo for the song had increased over the years," says Merrill, "but I suggested we slow it down to the tempo of Sinatra's later version, from the 1957 album Swingin' Affair on Capitol." (Pictured at left: Bushkin and Merrill, 2003.
"I got to spend a lot of time with Joe, always looking over his shoulder, absorbing stuff by osmosis," recalls Merrill, who coaxed Bushkin out of retirement in the early 1990s and performed with him at festivals and clubs such as New York's Tavern on the Green and L.A.'s Jazz Bakery until his passing in 2004 at age 87. He also produced and wrote liner notes for CD reissues of four Bushkin albums, including last fall's release of Live at the Embers (Dot Time Legends) from 1952.

Bob Merrill
Born in Manhattan in 1958, Bob Merrill traces his early interest in jazz to the fact that Benny Goodman lived in the penthouse of the building he grew up in on the Upper East Side. After his father took him to a Tonight Show taping where he heard Doc Severinsen, Merrill devoted himself to the trumpet (Bushkin's second instrument). He studied with William Vacchiano, first trumpet of the New York Philharmonic, and received improv tips as a teen from Red Rodney. Merrill attended both the New England Conservatory of Music (studying with Jaki Byard, in whose Apollo Stompers he played) and Harvard, where he co-founded a jazz concert series at the Hasty Pudding Club and led a house band for such visiting artists as Illinois Jacquet, George Coleman, Lee Konitz, and Warne Marsh.
Merrill released his first album as a leader, Catch as Catch Can, in 1997, the same year he was featured on American Movie Classics leading the AMC Orchestra on the series Gotta Dance! His second album, Got a Bran' New Suit, featured pianist Bill Charlap among others. It was followed by Christmastime at the Adirondack Grill, and then the wildly eclectic Cheerin' Up the Universe (2015), which featured pianist John Medeski and trombonist Roswell Rudd.
On Thursday May 4, Merrill will preside over a Joe Bushkin Centennial concert at the BMCC Tribeca Performing Arts Center (199 Chambers Street, Manhattan), part of Jack Kleinsinger's Highlights in Jazz series. Featured performers include several from the new CD's cast (Wycliffe Gordon, Eric Comstock, Nicki Parrott, John Colianni, Harry Allen) as well as pianists Ted Rosenthal and Spike Wilner.  


Photography: Pam Setchell



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USA: JD Allen - Radio Flyer(2017)


Radio Flyer 
JD Allen’s previous recording Americana won widespread critical acclaim for it’s ground breaking melodic and harmonic explorations and for its impressive emotional intensity. While that album presented Allen’s ideas with a somewhat contemplative hand, Radio Flyer moves with a more unbridled enthusiasm, testing the possibilities jazz has for individual expressionism and improvisational freedom. With guitarist Liberty Ellman on hand the quartet presents Allen’s seven original compositions bristling with energy while maintaining a cohesive, comprehensive unity of thought and purpose. “JD Allen’s writing for the tenor saxophone is effortlessly idiomatic, embroidered aria-like melodies and singular solo reflections give way to sinuous vocalastics and spirited dances. Textures are harmonically and unbelievably rich, yet never clogged.” – Raul da Gama “The JD Allen Trio is an almost telepathic, three-headed machine...But it’s important to emphasize that Allen himself is the best saxophonist under 60 in jazz, destined to be ranked with John Coltrane, Joe Henderson, Sonny Rollins, and Wayne Shorter. So if you haven’t been paying attention, the time to start is now.” – Burning Ambulance 

Thursday, April 27, 2017

USA: CAROL SUDHALTER - CAMILLERI FUNDRAISING CAMPAIGN and UPCOMING DATES

Carol Sudhalter and the Astoria Big Band have launched a fundraising campaign for the computerization and eventual publication of the library of
Charlie Camilleri's big band arrangements. 



To hear a full explanation of this project,
or to make donations, go to this
link

For direct donations
contact Carol at sudsaxter@gmail.com
or 917 667 5331.



Carol Sudhalter
Director, Mix n Match Music
Director, Astoria Big Band/Astoria Jazz Band

http://sudhalter.com

USA: RANDY INGRAM-The Wandering Import (2017)


The Wandering 


2017 release. Pianist-composer Randy Ingram has put himself in a position to reveal more about his musical identity by scaling down to record The Wandering, a sophisticated, personal and enlightening duo album with bassist Drew Gress. For Ingram's debut performance at Mezzrow, bassist Drew Gress was his ideal duo partner. Ingram soon decided to record a duo album with Gress. They performed additional gigs and lined up a date at Brooklyn Recording with engineer Michael Perez Cisneros.

ISRAEL: Avishai Cohen - Cross My Palm With Silver (2017)


Cross My Palm With Silver 
A year after his impressionistic, critically-lauded ECM debut Into The Silence, trumpeter Avishai Cohen s Cross My Palm With Silver introduces a program of new pieces which put the focus on the ensemble, on teamwork, with a quartet of the highest caliber. The adroit, almost telepathic interplay among the musicians allows Avishai Cohen to soar, making it clear why he is one of the most talked-about jazz musicians on the contemporary scene. All of these people together are my dream team , says the charismatic trumpeter of fellow players Yonathan Avishai, Barak Mori and Nasheet Waits, who share his sense for daring improvisation and his feeling for structure. I feel we're in a perfect place with the balance. It's open and there s so much room for the improvisation to take the music any place we can. At the same time the composition is very specific and the vibe is very direct and thought about. As with Into The Silence, Cross My Palm With Silver was produced by Manfred Eicher at Studios La Buissonne in the south of France. 

Wednesday, April 26, 2017

USA: The 50 Best Jazz Clubs in America

The Best 50 Jazz Clubs In America


Jazz is a true American art form. Some have even called it America’s classical music.
The best way to listen to jazz isn’t at home on your iTunes but at your local nightclub. Jazz, like any other type of music, is best heard live.
Yet, jazz is not like pop and rock music. It’s complex. It’s challenging. You need to go to jazz. Jazz does not come to you.
With that being said, we have complied a list of what we consider The Best 50 Jazz Clubs in America.
The criteria we used to choose these venues includes types of jazz and blues music performed, club ambiance and intimacy, choice of performers, reputation and more.
The following places are not only great places to listen to great jazz and blues, they are also great starting points to introduce yourself to America’s music.
If you’re already familiar with the genre, then the following 50 establishments are the type of jazz clubs you can visit to enjoy a tasty cocktail, a fine meal and some of the best live jazz and blues.

You can see the article here: http://www.clickitticket.com/best-jazz-clubs/